$ 25.95
Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found
Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found Garlic and Onions - Varieties not Easily Found

Many grocers have great supplies of Garlic and Onions. Probably they have not been culled through to the highest quality as our sources do for us, but we include here the varieties that we think you will have a hard time finding at local grocers. Don't forget the wild foraged Ramps  (when in Season). 

Black Garlic. Black Garlic, originally intended as a healthy dietary supplement, has become one of the hottest new "must-have" ingredients in the cutting edge chef's pantry. The unique qualities of Black garlic are the result when whole garlic heads are fermented under heat for several months. The flavor of black garlic can be difficult to describe - slightly sweet, with subtle hints of licorice and fennel, with subdued, but distinctive, true garlic flavor intact. Its chewy-gooey texture is reminiscent of sun-dried tomatoes or cured olives.

Fresh Spring Onions. Spring onions are sweeter and mellower than regular onions, but the greens are more intense in flavor than scallions. The bulbs can be red or white, depending on the varietal, and while they can be used in much the same way as regular bulb onions, they are great grilled, roasted whole, or used like pearl onions. Not Currently Available

Fresh Green Garlic. Green garlic is really just a young garlic plant. Green garlic looks very much like thicker scallions or spring onions — they are long and slender with tender green tops, and the white parts can be tinged with pink or purple. If you're not sure if you're looking at green garlic or spring onions, just give it a sniff. The plant should smell like garlic, not onions. Green garlic has a milder, fresher, and sweeter taste than regular hardnecked garlic. The whole plant can be eaten, and it has a spicier, more intense bite than scallions, but can be used in much the same way.

Garlic braids. One always needs garlic - why not have your supply be beautiful. Great for gifts.

White Cippolini Onions. A stock item when in season, which is typically all year, however, supplies may be short during the summer months.  These round, squatty onions are general a half-to-silver dollar size and are terrific when roasted, sautéed, or kabobed. On average, there are 18-20 onions per pound. Mild and sweet in flavor, these onions are sure to be on the tables of gourmets for years to come. Not Currently Available

Red Cippolini Onions. Same deep onion flavor as white cippolini but in red. These disc shapped goodies are wonderful roasted with quail or lamb and great on shish kabobs. Not Currently Available

White Pearl Onions. Often one cannot find these just when you need them. Coq au Vin, boeuf bourguignon and so much more.  On average, there are 30-35 onions per pound. They are wonderful when paired with fresh sweet peas (snap peas in particular), or when kabobed, roasted, or baked with virtually any entree imaginable.Not Currently Available

Red Pearl Onions. Same as White - just red. Not Currently Available

Garlic ScapesRaw garlic scapes are crunchy like green beans or asparagus, but you can eat scapes raw or cooked, whole or chopped. Prepping them couldn’t be easier: Just trim and discard the stringy tip of the scape, then cut crosswise, either into tiny coins or string bean-like stalks. The easiest way to think about cooking with garlic scapes is to use them the way you would use garlic or scallions, although there’s hardly a wrong way to enjoy these tasty tendrils.

Fresh Ramp Bulbs. Ramp bulbs and leaves may be diced and used just as you would use onions, green onions, leeks, chives and garlic, but they are much more potent.  They pair well with the following: pasta, eggs, chanterelles and other wild mushrooms, potatoes, stir fried and raw greens, and pork.

 

Linda Hampsten - Premier Chef and Caterer