Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming
Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming Mushrooms-Seasonal Wild Foraged - Chanterelles Currently Available, Matsutake and Lobster Coming
$ 32.50

These fresh-foraged mushrooms are found wild all across of the US. Chef Daniel Asher likes the source for these, as the forgers - a special breed of optimistic treasure hunters - know the vast forests better than their own backyards.  The wild flavors are unmatched, and the culinary possibilities are boundless.

Current Selections:

YellowfootThe yellowfoot mushroom, sometimes called the "winter chanterelle." is a petite mushroom with a delicate flavor. Not Currently Available

Olive Orchard Morels. Morels have been called by many local names; some of the more colorful include dryland fish, because when sliced lengthwise then breaded and fried, their outline resembles the shape of a fish; hickory chickens, as they are known in many parts of Kentucky; and merkels or miracles, based on a story of how a mountain family was saved from starvation by eating morels. Their unique flavor is prized by cooks worldwide, with recipes and preparation methods designed to highlight and preserve it. As with most edible fungi, they are best when collected or bought fresh. One of the best and simplest ways to enjoy morels is by gently sauteeing them in butter, cracking pepper on top and sprinkling with salt. They are great additions to meat dishes or soups. However, as morels are known to contain thermolabile toxins, they must always be cooked before eating. . Out of Season

Western Dark Morel - In Season

Western Blaonde Morel - In Season

Imported Chanterelle . One of the best known and liked wild mushrooms. They have a delicate fruity order, and flavor similar to apricots.In Season

Louisiana Chanterelle These Chanterelles are from the coastal area of Louisiana USA. These mushrooms vary in size. Due to where they are growing, your chanterelles will vary in moisture content, some are wetter if it rains on the coast, some are dryer depending on if it is dry on the coast.DO NOT WASH THEM! Use a soft brush to clean the debris from your chanterelles. When they get bigger they are more brittle, which means they will break in transit, there is nothing we can do about that. Some will break but we do everything we can to minimize the breakage.Do not let your mushrooms sit outside, be sure to put them in the refrigerator as soon as they arrive. If the moisture content is high, wrap your chanterelles in paper towels and then in a hand towel so it soaks up the excess of moisture.

Mousseron: Mousseron mushrooms are referred to as ‘Bonnet mushrooms’ in Scotland, likely for the shape of the fungi’s cap. Mousseron mushrooms hold up well to cooking for longer periods of time and braising is recommended. The mushrooms pair well with poultry and pastas. Add Mousseron mushrooms to omelets or stir-fry. Mousseron mushrooms have a big flavor and a rich taste. Some liken its flavor to that of a Porcini mushroom. The texture of these is firm and they can be somewhat chewy, but have also been described as slightly crunchy. Not Currently Available

Porcini  Also known as the Cepes (a variety) and King Bolete, these are generally considered the best. They have a nutty, deeply fungal, and sometimes coriander-like aroma and flavor. These have limited bug damage and are grade B. Grade A available on request. (e-mail us at info@to-table.com). Out of  Season

Lobster from Alabama and the Pacific Northwest. The lobster mushroom is actually a type of parasite that attacks many species of mushrooms, turning their outside the color of a cooked lobster shell. They have a crunchy texture and a shellfish-like odor and flavor. Out of Season

White Matsutake. What the matsutake, the pine mushroom, lacks in the beauty of a chanterelle or Lobster, it makes up for in its distinct spicy aromatic odor with an incredible and complex flavor. Out of Season

Black Trumpet.  The Black Trumpet mushroom's given name suggests its shape, albeit the shape is more interpretive, often appearing more like a frail flower. The mushrooms have a waxy charcoal-gray exterior and a deep brown, near black flesh. The cap blends fluidly into the stem, both edible and equal in texture and flavor. Black Trumpets have a soft yet chewy texture and a rich, buttery, woodsy flavor with a sweet aroma. Out of Season

Hedgehog Mushroom. The hedgehog mushroom a.k.a. sweet tooth really is a close relatives of the chanterelle and their aroma is strikingly similar. Mushrooms with teeth? As a matter of fact, yes. Nothing intimidating, mind you, but these mushrooms do have small toothlike projections rather than gills on their lower cap surfaces. Out of Season

Chicken of the Woods is one of the most recognizable fungi of North America. It grows in bright white-yellow-orange brackets out the sides, or bases of trees and is generally found in large blooms. This mushroom has a lemony, meaty taste. Some think it tastes like its chicken namesake; others describe the flavor as being more like crab or lobster. Whatever your opinion, the chicken fungus makes a great substitute for meat in almost any dish. Out of Season

 

See recipe ideas here

 

Daniel Asher, head chef at Root Down & Linger

Chef Daniel AsherRoot Down and Linger